Introduction

Suburban Walks > Maps

Sudbury Trails

This web page is meant to be an index to maps of trails in Sudbury. The focus is on finding good maps. Brief comments about each area are included. It is assumed that you are familiar with Sudbury or that you can use Google to find the parking area for each property.

Only areas that allow dogs are included. In general, the trails shown are suitable for an afternoon stroll, not an exploration of overgrown areas or agricultural fields.

Custom maps have been created by the author for eight Sudbury conservation areas. Maps have been created with GPS Utility. The maps are based on gps readings with an overlay from the Sudbury Geographic Information System (GIS). For custom maps, see the methodology section for ideas on accuracy and the use of a gps device. To download gpx files for use on your gps device, see the gps data section.

Extracts of Sudbury Valley Trustees (SVT) maps have been used for six conservation areas. Links to the original maps are provided for each of these maps.

Disclaimer: All paths described are provided in good faith. The maps and paths included here are not an indication of right of way, but an indication of general direction only. Any walk undertaken is done so at your own risk.

Conservation Areas

Select any of the names in this list to view the map and description.

Brue's Woods
Cutting Farm
Davis Farm
Gray Reservation
Haynes Meadow
Hop Brook
King Phillip
Lincoln Meadows
Lyons-Cutler Reservation
Memorial Forest
Nobscot
Nobscot Scout Reservation
Piper Farm
Weisblatt
Wolbach Farm

In part to encourage you to make use of the Sudbury GIS, I have provided approximate coordinates of the primary parking area in Sudbury for each conservation area. If you open the GIS web page by selecting the link above, you will see a small map and a row of icons at the top. Two icons on the right are a small box and a large box. Click on the large box to enlarge the map. As you move the cursor around the map, the x and y coordinates will be displayed in the lower right hand corner. Move the cursor until the coordinates match the values listed for the conservation area you would like to visit. Click on the map and it will zoom in on the area of interest. Then, go to the "Map Layers" tab (top left). Scroll to the bottom. Select the "Open Space: Lands" check box. The conservation area will become colored in. Go back to the map and click on the area you are interested in. Do this until you see where the conservation area is in Sudbury. Find street names to help you drive there. If you need to zoom out, select the magnifying glass icon with the minus sign from the row of icons near the top of the page.

There is a lot of information that can be accessed from the "Map Layers" tab. For example, you can select "Contours" to see the elevations of features and you can select "Wetlands, Town (2008)" to see the wetland areas.

The parking areas for Sudbury conservation areas are shown below.

Parking Areas

Brue's Woods Reservation

This is a Sudbury Valley Trustees property on Concord Road adjacent to the Nixon School. It is a pleasant walk with an open understory. This is an "out and back" walk. There is no round-trip path. As of June, 2013, there was a blackberry/raspberry patch due north of the "2" on the map at the end of the short trail. There is parking on Plympton Road (Sudbury GIS coordinates: 682800 2965900). Click on the image below to download an excellent map and site description.

Brues Woods

Cutting Farm Conservation Land

The July, 2013 Conservation Commission description of Cutting Farm states: "The Cutting Farm is a new piece of conservation land recently acquired by the town. The 55 acre parcel will be developed into community recreation space. Trails, a playing field and a canoe launch are under construction."

A poster at the Cutting Field parking lot states: "In 2004, at Annual Town Meeting, the town of Sudbury voted to spend Community Preservation Act monies to purchase the land for Cutting Field and fund its construction. The money appropriated also went towards purchasing the development rights, in the form of an Agricultural Preservation Restriction (APR) on the adjacent 60 acre parcel shown on the adjacent map, outlined in orange. ... In addition to the APR and Cutting Field, the Town Meeting article provided for limited public access rights to the preserved parcel for passive recreation. The regulations governing this use can be found on this board. The rules have been mutually agreed upon by the Conservation Commission and the Cutting family. Welcome to our land. Please respect it as we do. Ben, Becky and John Cutting"

Another poster at the Cutting Field parking lot states: "REGULATIONS FOR USE OF THE CUTTING LAND You are entering private property that is in active agricultural use; please stay on the trails. The trail system is available for passive recreational activities, such as hiking and cross country skiing. Cutting Pond is available for canoeing and fishing."

  1. The property is open for use from dawn to dusk.
  2. No fires or camping are permitted.
  3. No hunting without written permission.
  4. No motorized vehicles are allowed on the trails or pond.
  5. "Pack It In - Pack It Out" - "Leave No trace" - "Take Only Pictures"
  6. No pets allowed in order to protect the nursery stock.
  7. Marked trails are shown on the adjacent map ...
  8. No picking or removal of plants or parts of plants.

Cutting Farm Conservation Land is located on Route 27 at the Maynard line. There is parking at Cutting Field (Sudbury GIS coordinates: 672100 2973000). Cutting Farm is accessed by walking south through the row of pines and then west. As of June, 2013, it was possible to walk the wide dirt roads between the many plots of shrubs and trees. It was possible to walk up to the shore of Cutting Pond. A 2008 aerial photo from the Sudbury GIS system gives a sense of the layout of Cutting Farm. There is no map.

Cutting Farm

Davis Farm Conservation Land

This is a 61-acre conservation area managed by the Sudbury Conservation Commission. It is located on Route 117 just east of Windmill Drive. There is a good network of trails. This is a heavily used area that is excellent for dog-walking.

Davis Farm

The parking lot is at the top of the map on Route 117, just east of Windmill Drive (Sudbury GIS coordinates: 682700 2977200). The blue lines are the locations of paths. The striped areas are wetlands. The green lines are elevation contours. The dashed grid lines are spaced at 500 feet.

The main path is a road to the cultivated field at the bottom of the path. Starting at the parking lot, walk along the main road parallel to Windmill Drive. At the fork, follow the road left around the hill that rises to 180 feet above sea level. When you come to the next trail junction you will be looking at the cultivated field. If you turn right, you can climb to the summit of the hill. If you turn left, you can take either of the two paths around the cultivated field. You can take any of the fields back toward the hill and then out to the parking lot.

If you take the road from the parking lot for a few hundred feet, you can take a sharp left and head essentially due east. There is a plank to take you across the narrow wet area. Walk through the field and turn right before you reach the tall trees. After you pass the farm pond on your right, there will be a bench on your left. Return by the path you came on. If you are agile and equipped for mud, you can, instead, walk the trails in the expanse of wetland that includes the farm pond.

Photos from Davis Farm, maps and more text are found in the Black Forest section of this web site.

Gray Reservation

Gray Reservation (green) is a Sudbury Valley Trustees property that connects to the Sudbury Water District property (beige) via the Sudbury Haynes Meadow Conservation Land (pink). There is a parking lot at the corner of Hudson Road and Old Lancaster Road (Sudbury GIS coordinates: 676600 2965800). Three other parking areas are shown on the map.

Click on the image below to download an excellent map and site description.

Gray Reservation

If you want to take a short walk, you can take the round-trip walk through Gray Reservation. This is an excellent trail through pine woods with water features, including an old dam.

If you want to spend an afternoon hiking, you can extend your walk over to the Sudbury Water District land (beige) with many options for a round trip. North of the NE corner of the Curtis Middle School land, there is a glacial kettle hole that was used for ice harvesting in the past. Note that you can walk close to the Hop Brook wetland or traverse the higher-level paths. For these longer walks, note that there are 4 parking areas.

Haynes Meadow Conservation Land

This land is administered by the Sudbury Conservation Commission. There is an excellent description of the area and a map on the Sudbury Conservation Commission web site.

Haynes Meadow

The Haynes Meadow trail map is shown above. Only the portion with maintained trails is included.

The spacing of the dashed grid lines is 100 feet. Trails are indicated with heavy blue lines. Haynes Meadow trails connect to Gray Reservation on the northeast (purple) and to Sudbury Water District Land (pink) on the west. See Gray Reservation for a map showing Haynes Meadow in the context of other conservation areas.

The parking lot is on Blueberry Hill Lane near 65 Blueberry Hill Lane (Sudbury GIS coordinates: 675200 2964000). Blueberry Hill Lane is on the west side of the Haynes Meadow Conservation Land.

Hop Brook Conservation Land

This land is parcel H11-0300, shown in green on the map. It is administered by the Sudbury Conservation Commission. There is a brief description of the area and a map on the Sudbury Conservation Commission web site.

This is one of the most accessible, interesting, and well maintained conservation areas in Sudbury.

Hop Brook

The Hop Brook trail map is shown above. Wetlands are indicated with stripes. Trails are indicated with heavy blue lines. Elevation contours are shown in green. The dashed grid lines are spaced at 500 feet. Frog pond is in the center. The primary parking lot is on Dutton Road near the easternmost trail (Sudbury GIS coordinates: 668200 2962000). Across the top are four access roads. From left to right, they are Surrey Lane, Barton Drive, Millpond Road, and Pine Street. Sudbury Valley Trustees has created a brochure for Memorial Forest that also includes a map of the Hop Brook Conservation Land.

Walkers generally include the railroad (MBTA) in their walks. There is an exciting railway trestle across Hop Brook, SW of Frog Pond. The Memorial Forest conservation land can be accessed from the westernmost trail where it crosses the railroad.

One of the highlights of a walk at Hop Brook is the beaver dam just to the east of Frog Pond where it connects to another small pond. Recently, a pedestrian bridge has been built over the beaver dam, allowing one to cross over at that point. From here there are good views of the ponds.

In the summer, there are generally groups of turtles sunning themselves on logs embedded in Frog Pond. Often there are great blue herons in Frog Pond and in the Hop Brook wetlands.

King Phillip Conservation Land

The King Phillip Conservation Land is administered by the Sudbury Conservation Commission. There is an excellent description of the area and a map on the Sudbury Conservation Commission web site. This area connects to the Garrison House (parcel H11-0015) on the NE corner of the site. It also connects to the Piper Farm Conservation Land via the Libby Conservation Land. The parking lot is on Route 27 near Wolbach Road (Sudbury GIS coordinates: 685200 2962300).

King Phillip

The King Phillip trail map is shown above. The King Phillip Conservation Land is shown in green. A portion of the Libby Conservation Land is the white area NW of the pond. A portion of the Piper Conservation Land is shown in pink. Elevation contours have been omitted to improve clarity. Trails are shown as dark blue lines. Wetlands are indicated with striping. The dashed grid lines are spaced at 500 feet. Upland trails are found to the west and northwest of the pond. The trail from the end of Old Berlin Road to the east is quite wet and muddy.

Lincoln Meadows Conservation Land

The Lincoln Meadows Conservation Land is administered by the Sudbury Conservation Commission. There is a brief description of the area and an old map on the Sudbury Conservation Commission web site. North of Lincoln Road, this area consists of two parts. The meadow portion on the western part of the site is a drained wetland area with community gardens, as well as, significant areas too poorly drained for agriculture. On the east, Round Hill rises from the meadow at approximately 120 feet above sea level to the summit at approximately 227 feet above sea level. All of the maintained trails are located on Round Hill. The Sudbury Unit of Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge is to the east across Weir Hill Road. Dogs are not allowed on the refuge. A trail on Round Hill connects with a trail on the refuge.

Round Hill.

Elevation contours are shown in green. Trails are shown as dark blue lines. Wetlands are indicated with striping. The dashed grid lines are spaced at 500 feet. The parking lot is on Lincoln Road midway between Water Row and Weir Hill Road (Sudbury GIS coordinates: 688500 2970000).

Sudbury Valley Trustees also provides an excellent map of Round Hill.

For walkers, the focus is on Round Hill. Round Hill is adorned with a series of old roads that were in active use when Round Hill was "cultivated to its top." There are also narrower trails on the north slope of round hill. This is an excellent area for dog walking and for nature study.

There are many distinct areas on or close to Round Hill. Some that come to mind are:

These areas contribute variety to any walk. If one is aware of which of these areas is favorable for the growth of high bush blueberries and which is favorable for low bush blueberries, a tasty snack may be had in mid-summer.

Lyons-Cutler Reservation

The Lyons-Cutler Reservation is a 340-acre property of Sudbury Valley Trustees. Sudbury Valley Trustees has created an excellent brochure that includes a map of the usual high quality.

Lyons-Cutler

The easiest parking is found at Feeley Field on Raymond Road (Sudbury GIS coordinates: 677800 2955900). Many of the paths are former farm roads. There are several areas that tend to be wet after rain. Most of the reservation is a low mound surrounded by wetlands. The highest point of the mound is 10 feet above the surrounding wetland.

The reservation property was sold in 1921 and allowed to return to forest over the ensuing 92 years. There are many large trees with an understory of high bush blueberries, buckthorn and cinnamon fern. The paths are rougher and wetter than on many of the other Sudbury conservation areas.

Memorial Forest

Memorial Forest is a 615-acre property of public and private open space. Sudbury Valley Trustees has created an excellent brochure that includes a map of the usual high quality.

Memorial Forest Memorial Forest connects to the Sudbury Hop Brook Conservation Area. There is parking on Dutton Road in Sudbury (Sudbury GIS coordinates: 666200 2960100)and on Hemenway Street in Malrborough.

Memorial Forest is an excellent dog walking area with several potential loops. Trails are wide and provide easy walking. For nature buffs, there are 3 streams: Hop Brook, Cranberry Brook, and Trout Brook. Perhaps, the most memorable area is the Hop Brook wetland as viewed from the bridge reached from the Dutton Road parking area.

Nobscot

Nobscot Conservation Land is a 138-acre property managed by the Sudbury Conservation Commission. Nobscot Conservation Land is indicated in pink. Wetlands are indicated with stripes. Elevation contours have been omitted to improve clarity. Trails are shown as dark blue lines. The dashed grid lines are spaced at 500 feet. The parking lot is located on Brimstone Lane at the Framingham line (Sudbury GIS coordinates: 668300 2952300). Framingham is colored beige.

Nobscot

See the Nobscot Scout Reservation section for another map of the eastern portion of the Nobscot Conservation Land.

There are three good reasons to vist the Nobscot Conservation Land:

Ford's Folly was a project of Henry Ford to provide water for fire fighting purposes. It is a concrete dam 30 feet high and 400 feet long that does not hold water. Apparently, it was constructed on incompetent, fractured bedrock. Ford's Folly is located on parcel L04-0361 on the northern section of the map. It is surrounded by the loop trail.

The Nobscot Scout Reservation is discussed in the next section.

Wittenborg Woods is an 83 acre woodland in Framingham with an excellent loop trail. To access Wittenborg Woods, cross Brimstone Lane from the Nobscot Conservation Land Parking lot, follow the trail to the north and west, and take the first left fork. Connect with the Wittenborg Woods trails at "NWCal5".

Nobscot Scout Reservation

The Nobscot Scout Reservation is owned and managed by the Knox Trail Council of the Boy Scouts of America. The Town of Sudbury and the Sudbury Valley Trustees purchased a 303 acre Conservation Restriction on much of the Sudbury portion of the land. Sudbury Valley Trustees has created an excellent brochure that includes a map of the usual high quality.

Nobscot Scout Reservation

In Sudbury, the Nobscot Scout Reservation connects to the Nobscot Conservation Land on Brimstone Lane and to the Weissblatt Conservation Land on Route 20. There are parking lots on these two properties. There is parking at the reservation on Nobscot Road (Sudbury GIS coordinates: 673200 2951700). The scout reservation property in Sudbury connects with scout property in Framingham. This property is bordered by a section of Callahan State Park. As one would expect, there is opportunity for many days of walks in this collection of properties.

Dog walking is allowed but dogs must be on a leash.

A virtual tour of Tippling Rock on the Bay Circuit Trail within the Boy Scout property provides and brief introduction to the Tippling Rock and Nobscot Hill summit. The virtual tour seems to work only with Internet Explorer.

Piper Farm

The Piper Farm Conservation Land is administered by the Sudbury Conservation Commission. The Piper Farm Conservation Land is connected to the King Phillip Conservation Land via the Libby Conservation Land. There is parking on Fieldstone Farm Road (Sudbury GIS coordinates: 682500 2963500); lower left on the map. There is room to park one car on Plympton Road (Sudbury GIS coordinates: 684200 2965200).

Piper Farm

The Piper Farm trail map is shown above. Elevation contours have been omitted to improve clarity. Trails are shown as dark blue lines. Wetlands are indicated with striping. The dashed grid lines are spaced at 500 feet.

The trails on Piper Farm include old cart paths and narrower foot paths. There are dry upland paths and the ravine wetland. This is an excellent area for dog walking.

Weisblatt

The Weisblatt Conservation Land is a connector from Boston Post Road (Route 20) to the Nobscot Boy Scout Reservation. It is also an excellent place for dog walking. On the map, Weisblatt Conservation Land is indicated in pink. The Nobscot Boy Scout Reservation is indicated in orange. Elevation contours have been omitted to provide clarity. Trails are indicated by a heavy blue line. The dashed grid lines are spaced at 200 feet. The parking lot is located on the north edge of the map on Route 20 (Sudbury GIS coordinates: 672100 2956300).

Weisblatt Conservation Land

Sudbury Valley Trustees has created an excellent brochure for the Nobscot Scout Reservation that includes a map of the Weisblatt Conservation Land.

Wolbach Farm

Wolbach Farm is the headquarters of the Sudbury Valley Trustees. There is parking on Wolbach Road (Sudbury GIS coordinates: 685200 2961900).

Wolbach Farm

There is a short loop walk.

Methodology

The work described on this page started out as a volunteer project to provide data to the Town of Sudbury that would be used to create trail maps on the Sudbury GIS system. From that, a methodology developed.

The plan was to use a gps device of the type used by hikers, specifically, a Garmin eTrex 30. The stated accuracy of gps devices used by hikers is 10 meters. So, any time you take a walk with your gps and record your track, any portion of the track can be in error by about 30 feet. If you walk the same path several times, the correct path is approximately the average of all the tracks. From experience, I find that at least four repetitions of each walk are required to get a good definition of a path. To make things a little more accurate, I decided to do waypoint averaging for important trail junctions. Then, I could make certain that the paths I created from gps data would pass through those junctions. Experience with this waypoint averaging scheme shows that, after 3 or 4 averaging sessions, the change in the waypoint position is 0.00001 degrees or less. This is equivalent to less than 4 feet. That seems to me to be close enough to ground truth.

If you use the gpx files I have generated, the gpx files should provide an accuracy of 4 feet for most of the trail sections. However, as you walk along, your gps device will still have a potential error of 10 meters or about 30 feet. Keep that in mind as you walk the trails with your gps. Your position as indicated on the GPS should be close to the uploaded gpx track but will probably not match exactly.

GPS Data

Files for upload to a gps are provided for the following custom maps:

Davis Farm
Haynes Meadow
Hop Brook
King Phillip
Lincoln Meadows/Round Hill
Nobscot
Piper Farm
Weisblatt

The files are zip files that will need to be extracted to obtain the gpx files.